From Poetry

Starving and Sated

Editor (now alumna) Maddie Woda reviews Jihyun Yun’s first collection, Some Are Always Hungry. In 2016, I stumbled upon Jihyun Yun’s poem “Recipe: Dak-dori-tang” in BOAAT. A freshman in Columbia’s English program, I was beginning to develop my taste for poetry. I liked narration, freshness, unapologetic earnestness. I did not want too much room for interpretation, worried I’d fall through the cracks and say something ridiculous in class. I preferred James Wright to John Ashbery. I could not name any poets who were not deceased white men.  I read “Recipe: Dak-dori-tang” and immediately fell in love with Yun’s style. While…

Close Reading Series: Morgan Levine on “Sonnet”

The Close Reading Series invites our board editors to write about a favorite piece from our Spring 2020 issue. These readings are not intended to be definitive interpretations; when we read, we bring with us our own histories, experiences, and references, all of which guide our relationship to the work before us. It is possible,…

Close Reading Series: Spencer Grayson on “Newly, rendered, truly”

The Close Reading Series invites our board editors to write about a favorite piece from our Spring 2020 issue. These readings are not intended to be definitive interpretations; when we read, we bring with us our own histories, experiences, and references, all of which guide our relationship to the work before us. It is possible,…

Bryn Evans: Weight, Time, & the Afrofuture

AN INTERVIEW CONDUCTED BY MORGAN LEVINE Bryn Evans received our Spring 2020 Poetry Prize for her poem “Thotiana’s interlude, or Barbara Mason reconsiders settling down.” Bryn and I called each other from our respective hometowns of Decatur, Georgia and Houston, Texas for this interview, which has been lightly edited for clarity. I’ve been a fan…

Landscape from a Train by Anja Chivukula

Red, all the olive fields were limned with ruddy gold, laden branches sprouting furrows, tangled boughs that carved them- selves in gaps between the morning, havens painted into crossties, stopgap limbs to pave  anew the solar path. In patchwork shreds, the silences sat struck, and some- thing spoke   that could have been a person …

Archivettes by Claire Adler

1.  Scattered with nebulous crockery we talk mothers their grief, their limpid yearning. Your father is to my father only quantitatively. His grandmother and her worried son frantic across the rutted old table.  Our earnest faith constructs so much glaring,  translucent joy. I do describe his shoestring body and lie when I wish his wife…

A Defence of Science

Growing out of a Fall 2017 project initially submitted for Professor Richard Sacks’ “The English Sonnet” course at Columbia University, Emily Sun’s essay is an analysis of a critical edition of Edgar Allan Poe’s “Sonnet—To Science.” The edition was produced by Sun herself from a number of existing editions of the poem, and is contained…