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100th Volume Retrospective: Untitled by Kate Farrell

Kate Farrell has taught poetry in nursing homes, in public schools, and at Columbia. She has published multiple books, including poetry anthologies coauthored with Kenneth Koch. Untitled by Kate Farrell Most of all, her hairsmells like shampoocatching on shouldersthen waves dark brownnearly to her waist.Her neck is so straight, and thin that onecan imagine her…

100th Volume Retrospective: Albuquerque by Frank Lima

Frank Lima had already published his own poetry collections by the time this poem was published in the Review. He received an MFA from Columbia. Albuquerque by Frank Lima The air moved across the sky like a giant as three men escaped into the desert. They became the figures of intimacy, like the mountain tops.…

100th Volume Retrospective: Perfect Timing by Diane Mehta

Diane Mehta is a freelance journalist and writer. She has previously published a book on writing poetry, and her debut poetry collection, Forest with Castanets, will be published in 2019. Perfect Timing by Diane Mehta   Imagine a moving train that gathers velocity in increasing intervals of distance and time, wind blowing from the northwest at…

100th Volume Retrospective: Nature Mort by Jim Jarmusch

Jim Jarmusch, a former editor of The Columbia Review, is a director, screenwriter, and actor. He won the Caméra d’Or prize at the 1984 Cannes Film Festival for his first major film Stranger than Paradise. Most recently, his film Paterson was in competition for the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival in 2016. Nature Mort by Jim Jarmusch   the…

100th Volume Retrospective: Poem by Tory Dent

The Columbia Review printed this work by Tory Dent while she was studying at Barnard College. She later published three volumes of poetry and received numerous awards and honors, such as the James Laughlin Award in 1999 for HIV, Mon Amour, which described her struggle with the disease. Dent passed away in 2005. Poem by…

A Meditation on Childhood Stories

I found an old diary of my mother’s a few weeks ago containing a number of humorous anecdotes and stories from my childhood. I don’t have many tangible memories of my younger years so it was nice to find something connecting me to them. Showing her, we laughed at the oddity of the questions and…

100th Volume Retrospective: Racing to the Coast by Leslie Gottesman

Today’s poem was written by Leslie Gottesman, who went on to become a professor of English at Golden Gate University. Racing to the Coast by Leslie Gottesman   The face fragments stumble past the sleep station The children are stamping to get to the home station We place the morning station carefully in the locked Japanese…

The Tyranny of Memory: Yanagihara in Amsterdam

Hanya Yanagihara’s 2015 novel A Little Life can be briefly summarized as the story of four college roommates, their enduring friendship and soaring careers, but it is so much more than a big-city Bildungsroman. About 100 pages in to the book’s 720, Jude St. Francis, the most reserved member of the group, recalls the first of his “episodes,” bouts of physical agony that continue for the rest of his life: …the pain had been so awful—unbearable, almost, as if someone had reached in and grabbed his spine like a snake and was trying to loose it from its bundles of nerves…

On Tallulah Bankhead by Augustus Edwin John (1930)

I first saw her at the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C., having a few minutes to spare before scurrying off to a panel at a literary conference, my notebook still tucked between stiff fingers nicked by the cold. The chill hung onto my exposed knuckles through the long halls and wary high ceilings, and as I browsed figures painted stiff and presidential, others twisted pantheonic in contrapposto, I kept wandering, clattering as loose change. I drifted past the marble and cast bronze, meandered through both Davinci and Harlem’s Renaissance, and ascended stairs partially to test the property that heat…

V-Sides and Rarities

I. Entomology It is in rare circumstances that the etymology of the word is as fascinating as the definition of the word itself. In the case of “vampire,” this is because the precise etymological origins of the word are obscured—both through years of cultural exchange and language migration, as well as the linguistic misrepresentations of…