A Reflection on Cowboy Poetry

It was by pure coincidence that I encountered news of the National Cowboy Poetry Gathering. A short blurb from a New York Times caught my attention and directed me to an article covering the event (linked below). It seemed like a niche celebration of a part of American life that dried up decades ago. I…

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Writer’s Block, Dickinson, and the Interior

I don’t remember when poetry came into my life…

Selected Works by Women Writers: A Recommended Reading List

In honor of International Women’s Day, the board has put together a list of works written by women that we feel people should be reading more. Enjoy! Gertrude Stein – “Melanctha” “Stein wrote ‘Melanctha’ in an immensely innovative style that removes narrative authority and places plot firmly in present tense. The novel rejected the conventional…

Entering Middle Earth … and Staying There: The J.R.R. Tolkien Exhibit at The Morgan

Going to the Tolkien exhibit at The Morgan Library was for me a bit of time travel. My dad had read me The Hobbit and all of the The Lord of the Rings as bedtime stories when I was in second grade. My childhood was dotted with references to Middle Earth—an Eowyn halloween costume, a…

Kenneth Koch Poetry Prize Winners

Congratulations to the recipients of the Kenneth Koch Poetry Prize in honor of our 100th volume: Mackenzie Turgeon CC’21 for her poem “American Studies for Black Kids” and Morgan Levine CC’22 for her poem “Ballad for O’Keefe Finding an Angel in a Canyon.”

100th Volume Retrospective: Happy Autumn Fields by John Ashbery

John Ashbery won the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award, and many other prizes. This poem was published by the Review over twenty years after he had earned his M.A. from Columbia. Happy Autumn Fields by John Ashbery I call it (though I’m no authority)The big syndrome, of when everythingLies down together. The pointed roofsThat called…

100th Volume Retrospective: from “Dakar Doldrums” by Allen Ginsberg

At Columbia University, Ginsberg, Kerouac, and other beat poets got to know each other. Many of them were published in the Review. from “Dakar Doldrums” by Allen Ginsberg IV Twenty days have drifted in the wakeOf this slow aged ship that carries coalFrom Texas to Dakar. I, for the sakeOf little but my causelessness of…